Only 1/3 of investors like their portfolio

Written by John Osbon on September 25, 2017

Research shows that only 1/3 of investors are currently comfortable with their investment portfolios. That’s a very low satisfaction rate, given how long and hard people work for their money. If you’re one of the many people not happy with their portfolio, we want you to know we are expanding our investor client base at Osbon Capital to include people who don’t yet meet our usual $5M threshold for investable assets. We know we can help many people who are not happy with what they have. Here are three examples. Do you see yourself among them?

The 20-Something Entrepreneur

You’re early in your career, unafraid to take a big chance, build a big business and achieve success. You know risk-taking favors the young since you have more time to recover from inevitable setbacks. Low on fear and high on energy and optimism, you set high standards and travel in a crowd that does the same. You’re eager to use your network to build a business and your own net worth. What kind of portfolio suits you? Most likely a “maximum growth with 100-year time frame” approach. There may be room for direct private investments where appropriate. You’re most interested in high return and can tolerate a lot of ups and downs. Your long-term perspective is reinforced by having most of your money in restricted accounts like IRAs or 401(k)s. You won’t be able to touch it for a long time. As such, diversification, asset location, being opportunistic and staying risk constant are important principles to follow.

The New Family

You’ve found, like generations before you, that something happens when the children come along. Goals multiply. Priorities shift. Time disappears. When college funding, a bigger or better house, or living on one income stream become serious conversation topics, it’s time to evaluate your portfolio and investment strategy. With each additional child your investment puzzle gets more complicated and the time available to solve the puzzle shrinks. You and your partner begin thinking multi-generationally, a far cry from your pre-children days. Financial planning – with all the related legal, tax, estate and insurance aspects – becomes urgent. At Osbon Capital, you will most likely want a growth portfolio. Growth portfolios throw off a generous cash flow and are tilted to upside potential. You are most likely net savers, and therefore net investors. As net investors, you can invest through a market decline, invest more at low prices, and reap the rewards when returns improve. We see new families as complicated, evolving, long-term projects with likely positive outcomes.

The Succesful Couple

You’re not all the way to $5M in investable assets, but you’re close. Your career success has put you in an enviable situation where you work first for satisfaction, not money. But you remain very busy, too busy to spend your time researching and optimizing a portfolio. With grown children and possibly grandchildren, your financial goals are shifting to match your personal and family priorities. Your portfolio needs to keep pace. In my experience, an income portfolio is a good choice for the successful couple. You can live partially or completely off the income, shielded somewhat from market mayhem. This approach will bring peace of mind amid troubled times and ominous headlines. The income portfolio says “we’ll be OK” as regular rebalancing keeps your risk constant and softens the triggers that might let you get carried away by optimism, or scared into inaction by pessimism.

More Service

Do any of these scenarios sound familiar? If so, there is good news at Osbon Capital. I mentioned earlier that we are expanding our client base. That means our financial quarterbacking, investment management, experience, checklists, and conversations are offered to you proactively as you and your family grow. You can take advantage of our offer by calling or emailing us with a question and we’ll get right back to you.

 –  John Osbon

You may also enjoy reading this article on why I started Osbon Capital because it also discusses the Osbon Culture.


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